After-school Study: Some Study Tips

An excellent after-school study facility is offered for two hours at the end of each school day. Parents and pupils find it very beneficial. It is particularly designed to suit third years, fifth years and sixth years with other year groups included subject to availability of places. The study centres are well supervised. Subject to demand holiday and Saturday study is also organised for sixth years. An attendance record is taken and Parents can check this at any time with the school

TIMES

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 3.55p.m. to 5.55p.m.
Wednesday 1:05p.m. to 2.50p.m.

MOTIVATION TO STUDY

is YOUR responsibility-it is up to you to get into the right frame of mind, and once you have made a decision to set aside a definite period of study each day, your mind will be more ready to study thus aiding a positive approach.

TO STUDY EFFECTIVELY

you need favourable surroundings:
(a) No noise and/or other distractions (TV, computers, radio, family activities);
(b) Desk/table, chair;
(c) A well lit and warm, ventilated room.

GOOD STUDY MUST BE FREQUENT, PLANNED, ACTIVE AND TESTED FREQUENT

How long should I spend at homework/study?

Year Group Hours per day Number of days study per week
Year 1 1.5 5
Year 2 2 5
Year 3 3 6
Year 4 4 4
Year 5 5 6
Year 6 6 7
PLANNED

PLANNING THE WORK is important. Set out a timetable for yourself, keeping in mind that study is best done when you are least tired. Set realistic and definite goals for yourself. Study your most difficult subject first when you are freshest, and keep study periods short with a few minutes break between subjects. Try to finish each day’s study by 10 p.m. to allow some time for relaxation before bedtime.

A CLEAR UNDERSTANDING

of what you are studying is essential. Ask your teacher to explain aspects of an assignment or subject you don’t understand. Remember, it is most unlikely that you will retain material you don’t understand.

CONCENTRATION

is very important and can be improved upon with effort. If your concentration is inclined to wander, devise your own method of getting it back. For example, switch the activity from reading to writing; or to another subject matter.

ACTIVE

AIDS TO LEARNING

  1. Make brief notes to aid memory;
  2. Actively think of the meaning of what you are learning and associate the new material with what you already know;
  3. Go back over the material, questioning yourself on it;
  4. Read it over more slowly, finding the answers to your questions;
  5. Recite it to yourself, recalling what you have read;
  6. Revise-preferable each week’s work and each month’s work.

MEMORISING:

  1. Active repetition helps recall;
  2. Memorise in the logical sequence of the material;
  3. Summarise long pieces;
  4. Learning by rote, or off-by-heart is helped by rhythmic patterns;
  5. It is useful to go over memorised material just before bedtime.

TESTED

REVISION involves going back over material already learnt, but, to be effective, it requires more than just reading over your notes or textbook. To be worthwhile, revision must be active involving asking yourself and answering questions (written and oral); understanding, reciting and recalling your notes; reading through old examination questions and testing yourself with problems you haven’t tried before.

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